Healing the Seas… And Our Diet, Too

Many issues are resulting from modern fishing , but they can be solved to everyone’s benefit.

You think that fishing is a rugged, old fashioned sort of occupation? Rough men brave the seas, the cold, switch night for day, all so they can provide us with tasty, even healthy food. OK, maybe you did hear a thing or two about overfishing, but as a rule people are fairly confident that this was just a little something that sensible people would manage to somehow solve.

Ghost Fishing

People are always astonished to learn how much damage lost and discarded fishing gear, left to decay in the world’s seas, can cause. It is estimated that ghost gear accounts for 10 percent of all marine litter, bearing a staggering weight of 640,000 tons, which ends up in our seas every year! Consider this number in terms of hosting a dinner party. If a large fish filet weighs about a pound, you would need a billion fish at your party to balance the weight of abandoned and discarded ghost fishing gear.

  • Fish net remnants are a threat for marine animals to get caught in them and many suffer a horrible death. This is known as “ghost fishing”.
  • As some species are more harmed than others, it disturbs natural food chains and eventually marine biodiversity.
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The Really Good Partnership

Luckily, many of the same market and technology principles that have shaped modern fishing are also shaping the sustainable response to its excesses.

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King Sized and Elected Support

In 2013 and 2014 the Healthy Seas initiative was active in two locations: the North Sea and the Adriatic Sea. A third location in Greece was in the early stages of implementation by late 2014. The project’s main goal is to remove harmful fishing gear from the sea in order to display its deadly impact and to engage stakeholders to ensure it would not happen in the future. Stakeholders include divers, fishermen, academia, media and youth who are influential in establishing better future practices.

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Infographic Healthy Seas results in 2014
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MP Neil Parish showing his Healthy Seas socks

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